Monday, September 04, 2017

Good comparison vs. bad comparison

A valuable distraction skill used in DBT is the acrostic ACCEPTS. It's the idea to use.... as ways to distract our minds from current emotional pain. The second C in ACCEPTS can be seemingly dangerous. Theodore Roosevelt said "comparison is the thief of joy." How can it be a valuable skill?

Bad comparison
I struggle with bad comparison on a daily basis. "I'm not as skillful as that other therapist." "I'm not as good of a mom as that person whose kids can sit still for more than 5 seconds." "I don't have as much money as the person sitting next to me based on their material possessions." These thoughts lead to my distorted thoughts. They cause depression. They steal my joy. 

Good comparison 
Yet, if I were to use the "C" as it is designed, I can use it to help me overcome some depressive feelings...
"I am much further along in my career than I was just a year ago." "I have three healthy (mentally and physically) children, nothing due to my own parenting, and I need to praise God for this fact, because others, who are much better than I, are suffering." "I have a loving husband when I one point in my life I questioned if I would ever find someone to love me as much as he does."
Comparison in ACCEPTS when used correctly can help remind us of our accomplishments due to hard work or of mercy due to nothing of our own doing. 

When I catch myself consumed with negative comparisons, I stop myself and think of what I try to teach my clients: ACCEPTS. 

Matthew 5:45 NASB

“so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for He causes His sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.”

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Our Hearts are Heavy

Baby Henry is with God now.

I am not very eloquent and don't know how to handle grief (but will learn in school!), so I don't know what to say right now.

It's unimaginable. It's scary. It's heart wrenching.
It's glorious. It's hopefulness.

Continue to pray for Anna and Matt and their families. They lost their whole world. Anna stayed at home with Henry and with a 15 month year old, every second of the day revolves around them, even when they're sleeping. So the change will be astounding.

Love you guys. Take time to be holy. Take time to love.

Monday, September 17, 2012

Updates on Baby Henry

Here is a post that was released about the same time as the CPR post:
“Henry’s MRI results did not come back as we hoped. Due to the lack of Oxygen to his brain t
hat he sustained when his heart stopped in the ambulance on the way to the first hospital, he has suffered “significant brain trauma.” Our hearts are heavy with this news, but not without hope. This next week will determine a lot about his future. And so we continue the waiting game. We feel so fortunate to be at Texas Children’s PICU with some of the best doctors in the world caring for Henry. But we also know that our God is an awesome God and that his healing hand is far more powerful than any medicine, surgery, or procedure. Please pray that we continue to see progress, however small, and that our little giant is some day restored. We are overwhelmed by all of the prayers, both public and private, that have been offered up to Him on Henry’s behalf. Don’t stop now. Love to all, Matt & Anna.”


This is today's update:
"Henry showed us a bit of those beautiful eyes this evening! It was small, but so very big. Your prayers are working, and we trust you will continue to petition God on Henry’s behalf. We cannot even begin to express our gratitude for all of the prayers, quoted scriptures, FB posts, changed profile pics, meals, calls and visits. We may not be able to respond to all of them, but we are reading everything and gaining great strength from all of you. Our little giant is famous, and our God is good!"
 
Praise God!

Sunday, September 16, 2012

A Prayer for Baby Henry

Ethan, Henry & Grayson 8/28/12 at Children's Musuem
A little baby boy from our church that is just two months older than Ethan is in the hospital this weekend. Baby Henry was on his way to the doctor Friday when he stopped breathing. His mother had to give him CPR while waiting on the ambulance. As of now, he is at Texas Children's on a respirator and heavily sedated. He may have brain damage due to his lack of oxygen. (Hoping I'm getting all the details correct.) This has really shaken our congregation and many many others. It's heartbreaking just thinking about it, but I wanted to post how to perform CPR on a baby if he/she stops breathing and how to help it if it's choking (Babycenter.com)

12 Months and Younger:

Choking

Step 1: Assess the situation quickly.

If a baby is suddenly unable to cry or cough, something is probably blocking her airway, and you'll need to help her get it out. She may make odd noises or no sound at all while opening her mouth. Her skin may turn bright red or blue.
If she's coughing or gagging, it means her airway is only partially blocked. If that's the case, let her continue to cough. Coughing is the most effective way to dislodge a blockage.
If the baby isn't able to cough up the object, ask someone to call 911 or the local emergency number while you begin back blows and chest thrusts (see step 2, below).
If you're alone with the baby, give two minutes of care, then call 911.
On the other hand, if you suspect that the baby's airway is closed because her throat has swollen shut, call 911 immediately. She may be having an allergic reaction – to food or to an insect bite, for example – or she may have an illness, such as croup.
Also call 911 right away if the baby is at high risk for heart problems.
Step 2: Try to dislodge the object with back blows and chest thrusts.
First do back blows
If a baby is conscious but can't cough, cry, or breathe and you believe something is trapped in his airway, carefully position him faceup on one forearm, cradling the back of his head with that hand.
Place the other hand and forearm on his front. He is now sandwiched between your forearms.
Use your thumb and fingers to hold his jaw and turn him over so that he's facedown along the other forearm. Lower your arm onto your thigh so that the baby's head is lower than his chest.
Using the heel of your hand, deliver five firm and distinct back blows between the baby's shoulder blades to try to dislodge the object. Maintain support of his head and neck by firmly holding his jaw between your thumb and forefinger.
Next, place your free hand (the one that had been delivering the back blows) on the back of the baby's head with your arm along his spine. Carefully turn him over while keeping your other hand and forearm on his front.
Then do chest thrusts
Use your thumb and fingers to hold his jaw while sandwiching him between your forearms to support his head and neck. Lower your arm that is supporting his back onto your opposite thigh, still keeping the baby's head lower than the rest of his body.
Place the pads of two or three fingers in the center of the baby's chest, just below an imaginary line running between his nipples. To do a chest thrust, push straight down on the chest about 1 1/2 inches. Then allow the chest to come back to its normal position.
Do five chest thrusts. Keep your fingers in contact with the baby's breastbone. The chest thrusts should be smooth, not jerky.
Repeat back blows and chest thrusts
Continue alternating five back blows and five chest thrusts until the object is forced out or the baby starts to cough forcefully, cry, or breathe on his own. If he's coughing, let him try to cough up the object.
If the baby becomes unconscious
If a baby who is choking on something becomes unconscious, you'll need to do what's called modified CPR. Here's how to do modified CPR on a baby:
Open his mouth and look for an object. If you can see an object, remove it with your little finger.
Give him two rescue breaths. If the air doesn't go in (you don't see his chest rise), tilt his head and try two rescue breaths again.

If his chest still doesn't rise, do 30 chest compressions.
Look in his mouth and remove the object if you see it. Give him two more rescue breaths.
Repeat the chest compressions and so on, until help arrives.

How to perform CPR


Step 1: Check the baby's condition.
Is the baby conscious? Flick her foot or gently tap on her shoulder and call out. If she doesn't respond, have someone call 911 or the local emergency number. (If you're alone with the baby, give two minutes of care as described below, then call 911 yourself.)
Swiftly but gently place the baby on her back on a firm, flat surface.
Make sure she isn't bleeding severely. If she is, take measures to stop the bleeding by applying pressure to the area. Don't administer CPR until the bleeding is under control.
Step 2: Open the baby's airway.
Tilt the baby's head back with one hand and lift his chin slightly with the other. (You don't have to tilt a baby's head back very far to open the airway.)
Check for signs of breathing for no more than ten seconds.
To check for breathing in a baby, put your head down next to his mouth, looking toward his feet. Look to see whether his chest is rising, and listen for breathing sounds. If he's breathing, you should be able to feel his breath on your cheek.
Step 3: Give two gentle "rescue" breaths.
If the baby isn't breathing, give her two little breaths, each lasting just one second. Cover the baby's nose and mouth with your mouth and gently exhale into her lungs only until you see her chest rise, pausing between rescue breaths to let the air flow back out.
Remember that a baby's lungs are much smaller than yours, so it takes much less than a full breath to fill them. Breathing too hard or too fast can force air into the baby's stomach.
If her chest doesn't rise, her airway is blocked. Give her first aid for choking, described above.
Step 4: Do 30 chest compressions.
With the baby still lying on his back, place the pads of two or three fingers in the center of his chest, just below an imaginary line running between his nipples.
With the pads of your fingers on that spot, compress the chest about 1 1/2 inches. Push straight down. Compressions should be smooth, not jerky.
Do 30 chest compressions at the rate of 100 per minute. When you complete 30 compressions, give two rescue breaths (step 3, above). (Each cycle of chest compressions and rescue breaths should take about 24 seconds.)
Step 5: Repeat compressions and breaths.
Repeat the sequence of 30 compressions and two breaths. If you're alone with the baby, call 911 or the local emergency number after two minutes of care.
Continue the sequence of compressions and breaths until help arrives, you find an obvious sign of life, an AED (automated external defibrillator) is ready to use, the scene becomes unsafe, or you are too exhausted to continue.
Even if the baby seems fine by the time help arrives, a doctor will need to check her to make sure that her airway is completely clear and she hasn't sustained any internal injuries.

1-12 Years old

Choking

Step 1: Assess the situation quickly.
If a child is suddenly unable to cry, cough, or speak, something is probably blocking her airway, and you'll need to help her get it out. She may make odd noises or no sound at all while opening her mouth. Her skin may turn bright red or blue.

If she's coughing or gagging, it means her airway is only partially blocked. If that's the case, encourage her to cough. Coughing is the most effective way to dislodge a blockage.

If the child isn't able to cough up the object, ask someone to call 911 or the local emergency number as you begin back blows and chest thrusts (see step 2, below).

If you're alone with the child, give two minutes of care, then call 911.

On the other hand, if you suspect that the child's airway is closed because her throat has swollen shut, call 911 immediately. She may be having an allergic reaction – to food or to an insect bite, for example – or she may have an illness, such as croup.

Also call 911 right away if the child is at high risk for heart problems.
Step 2: Try to dislodge the object with back blows and abdominal thrusts.
First do back blows
If a child is conscious but can't cough, talk, or breathe, or is beginning to turn blue, stand or kneel slightly behind him. Provide support by placing one arm diagonally across his chest and lean him forward.

Firmly strike the child between the shoulder blades with the heel of your other hand. Each back blow should be a separate and distinct attempt to dislodge the obstruction.
Give five of these back blows.
Then do abdominal thrusts
Stand or kneel behind the child and wrap your arms around his waist.
Locate his belly button with one or two fingers. Make a fist with the other hand and place the thumb side against the middle of the child's abdomen, just above the navel and well below the lower tip of his breastbone.

Grab your fist with your other hand and give five quick, upward thrusts into the abdomen. Each abdominal thrust should be a separate and distinct attempt to dislodge the obstruction.
Repeat back blows and abdominal thrusts
Continue alternating five back blows and five abdominal thrusts until the object is forced out or the child starts to cough forcefully. If he's coughing, encourage him to cough up the object.
If the child becomes unconscious
If a child who is choking on something becomes unconscious, you'll need to do what's called modified CPR. Here's how to do modified CPR on a child:
Place the child on his back on a firm, flat surface. Kneel beside his upper chest. Place the heel of one hand on his sternum (breastbone), at the center of his chest. Place your other hand directly on top of the first hand. Try to keep your fingers off the chest by interlacing them or holding them upward.

Perform 30 compressions by pushing the child's sternum down about 2 inches. Allow the chest to return to its normal position before starting the next compression.
Open the child's mouth and look for an object. If you see something, remove it with your fingers.
Next, give him two rescue breaths. If the breaths don't go in (you don't see his chest rise), repeat the cycle of giving 30 compressions, checking for the object, and trying to give two rescue breaths until the object is removed, the child starts to breathe on his own, or help arrives.

How to Give CPR


CPR isn't hard to do. Follow these steps:
Step 1: Check the child's condition.
Is the child conscious? Tap on the child's shoulder and call out. If she doesn't respond, have someone call 911 or the local emergency number. (If you're alone with the child, give two minutes of care as described below, then call 911 yourself.)

Swiftly but gently place the child on her back on a firm, flat surface.

Make sure she isn't bleeding severely. If she is, take measures to stop the bleeding by applying pressure to the area. Don't administer CPR until the bleeding is under control.
Step 2: Open the child's airway.
Tilt the child's head back with one hand and lift his chin slightly with the other. This will open his airway.

Check for signs of breathing for no more than ten seconds.

To check his breathing, put your head down next to his mouth, looking toward his feet. Look to see whether his chest is rising, and listen for breathing sounds. If he's breathing, you should be able to feel his breath on your cheek.
Step 3: Give two "rescue" breaths.
If the child isn't breathing, give her two breaths, each lasting just one second. Pinch the child's nose shut, place your mouth over hers, and exhale into her lungs until you see her chest rise.

If her chest doesn't rise, her airway is blocked. Give her first aid for choking, described above.

If the breaths go in, give the child two rescue breaths in a row, pausing between breaths to let the air flow back out.
Step 4: Do 30 chest compressions.
Kneel beside the child's upper chest. Place the heel of one of your hands on the child's sternum (breastbone) at the center of her chest. Place your other hand directly on top of the first hand. Try to keep your fingers off her chest by interlacing them or holding them upward.
To do a chest compression, push the child's sternum down about 2 inches. Allow the chest to return to its normal position before starting the next compression.

Do 30 chest compressions at the rate of 100 per minute. Then give the child two rescue breaths (step 3, above). (Each cycle of chest compressions and recue breaths should take about 24 seconds.)
Step 5: Repeat compressions and breaths.
Repeat the sequence of 30 chest compressions and two breaths. If you're alone with the child, call 911 or the local emergency number after two minutes of care.
Continue the sequence of chest compressions and rescue breaths until help arrives, you find an obvious sign of life, an AED (automated external defibrillator) is ready to use, the scene becomes unsafe, or you are too exhausted to continue.
Even if the child seems fine by the time help arrives, a doctor will need to check her to make sure that her airway is completely clear and she hasn't sustained any internal injuries.

Also, put this number in your cell phone for poison control:
American Association of Poison Control Centers at (800) 222-1222 

What should I do if my toddler swallows something that could be poisonous?

First, get the rest of whatever your toddler has swallowed away from him. Then try to make him spit out anything left in his mouth. Keep a sample — unless you have the container — in case it's needed to identify the poison. Call 911 immediately if you notice any of the following symptoms:

Children's Symptom Guide

Is it serious? Find out fast
 
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Severe throat pain
  • Burns on the lips or mouth
  • Convulsions
  • Unconsciousness
  • Extreme sleepiness
Do not try to make your child vomit. If your child has swallowed a strong acid, such as toilet bowl cleaner, or a strong alkali, such as drain or oven cleaner, vomiting could further injure him by bringing the burning substance back up through his throat and mouth.

What if my toddler doesn't seem to be seriously ill?

If your child doesn't have any of the serious symptoms listed above, call your local poison control center. If you don't have the number handy, call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at (800) 222-1222 to be automatically redirected to your local poison control center.

Experts at the poison center will need to know your toddler's approximate weight, any medical conditions he may have, any medications he's taking, and as much information about the substance he swallowed as you can give. If possible, have the container with you when you make the call. The poison center may need to know the ingredients listed on the label. If your child has swallowed something like part of a plant, describe it as completely as you can.

If your child has swallowed prescription or over-the-counter medication, have the container handy so you can provide all the necessary information. If you can, estimate the maximum number of pills your toddler could have swallowed by subtracting any pills you can account for from the original number in the bottle.



Thursday, August 09, 2012

Ethan walking

videoEthan will turn one next Friday and for the last two weeks he has been walking like crazy. He went from two steps to the whole house in a matter of hours. Per request, here is a video...

Monday, May 21, 2012

A Rarity

I, Emily Strode, finished a book this weekend! This is a big deal for me because I hardly ever read a book, and even more rarely finish one. I'm not a bad reader, I can read just fine. I just don't want to. I'd rather take a nap or watch TV. Knowing this, I still asked for Garry Marshall's My Happy Days in Hollywood: A Memoir for Mother's Day.
amazon.com
It was good. Not great. I didn't like his writing style, which is ironic because his movies are my favorite. Next book I want to read is Ellen DeGeneres' Seriously... I'm Kidding.
amazon.com

Wednesday, May 09, 2012

A couple of my favorite things

Hey guys! Miss me?? I would love to say I've been incredibly busy, but it's just not the case. I have, however, been officially accepted to my master's program and will start class in August! Super excited.

One of my favorite blogs, Or So She Says..., always does a "A Few of My Favorite Things" post and I thought I'd share with you a two of my favorite things.

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

This weekend, I finally jumped on the bareMinerals bandwagon, and I must say that I'm glad I did. I was tired of trying drugstore foundations that I was never happy with. And on top of that, you had to find a drugstore powder, which was even harder for me to chose. I knew I loved the Mineral Veil by Bare Minerals already. I find it magical. So on Saturday I went to Ulta and asked for a makeover. On one side, the makeup lady put on Bare Minerals and on the other side she put on Studio Gear liquid foundation. Oh brother! Now I don't know what I want!! After much blank staring into a mirror and with a flippant decision I decided on Bare Minerals. I bought the $63 value pack with 3 brushes, matte foundation, mineral veil, "warmth" aka bronzer, and "skin rev-uper". I was nervous at first about the mineral idea. I felt if it wasn't liquid and it's supposed to be "natural" how could I tell if the powder was actually affixing to my skin. But don't worry, you can tell! But not in a bad way. I feel natural, but not splotchy. And most importantly, at the end of the day, it still looks pretty good! Oh, I forgot to mention, I got the lightest of the light and the lady said it was still too dark for my skin color. Fabulous!

Photo Courtesy of Amazon

Next, I have to tell you of something I'm surprised I haven't heard too much about - Sanuk Yoga Mat Flip Flips. I feel like I'm in heaven with every step I take. I wear them as house shoes because I can't get enough of them. I find $30 expensive for flip flops, but not these. I'd buy another pair in a heartbeat! When I saw them at Dillards, I think I had heard of the brand, but this is something EVERY woman should have. If I were Oprah, I would be saying "AND YOU GET A PAIR! AND YOU GET A PAIR! AND YOU GET A PAIR!"

And a secret third favorite thing...THIS GUY!
Photo Courtesy of Tami Kosters